Pain management in childhood cancer

Pain management in childhood cancer

Research shows that when families are encouraged to maintain their caring role as much as possible, children's anxieties are lessened and the pain they experience is reduced. Families can expect to be as involved in their child's care as they wish to be.

Family involvement

Research shows that when families are encouraged to maintain their caring role as much as possible, children's anxieties are lessened and the pain they experience is reduced. Families can expect to be as involved in their child's care as they wish to be.

Anxiety and fear can make pain feel worse. They can often be minimised with explanations of what is going to happen and by suggesting small actions that your child can choose to do, such as:

  • how to get onto a treatment bed
  • which finger for a skin prick
  • how to travel to the operating theatre

Although children may display or verbalise more distress in the presence of their parents / caregivers, there is evidence that your presence is a helpful contribution to pain management. Also, because you can often accurately judge your child's pain, your involvement in care can promote the early recognition of pain and its accurate assessment.

There are some hints for you to use when you are involved in procedures that may be painful for your child in:

What if I don’t feel able to stay with my child during some procedures?

Health professionals will recognise and respect the amount you wish to or are able to be involved in your child's care.

Where to go for information and support

On this website

Pain and childhood cancer
Treatment of pain in childhood cancer
Childhood cancer: Where to go for more information and support

All the information in the Childhood cancer section of this website has been written by health professionals who work in the field of paediatric oncology. They have been reviewed by the members of the National Child Cancer Network (NZ). Medical information is authorised by the National Child Cancer Network Clinical Leader.

 

This page last reviewed 22 June 2013.
Email us your feedback


On this page