Principle 11: Knowledge and skills

Principle 11: Knowledge and skills

Health and disability service providers whose knowledge and skills enable them to respond appropriately to children and young people’s clinical, emotional, developmental, educational and cultural needs, should care for children, young people and their families.

Introduction

The following is one of a group of principles which recognise the particular needs of children and young people receiving health and disability support services. The principles describe what should be provided when your child or young person receives those services. They are based on expert opinion and a considerable body of literature in New Zealand and overseas and they have been developed after wide consultation. See all the principles listed in Principles: what health and disability services should provide for your child or young person.

Knowledge and skills

Principle: Health and disability service providers whose knowledge and skills enable them to respond appropriately to children and young people’s clinical, emotional, developmental, educational and cultural needs, should care for children, young people and their families.

Caring for children requires different knowledge and skills from those required when working with adults.

You can expect all staff who have contact with your child or young person to have had specific education, within their organisation, on the needs of children. This includes, porters, clerks, pathology staff, x-ray and plaster room technicians. You can expect all health care professionals to be appropriately qualified for the posts they hold and the service they provide.

You can expect staff working with your child or young person to have the appropriate skills to:

  • deal with the specific problems of childhood illness, where your child may react differently to adults both physically and emotionally
  • communicate with your child or young person
  • provide care and support for your whole family
  • work with families from different backgrounds, cultures and beliefs, acknowledging the effect that these have on your child's care and on your family's life
  • work with other providers and agencies in the co-ordination of your child’s care

This page last reviewed 25 March 2015.
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