Storing Breast Milk Video Transcript

Storing Breast Milk Video Transcript

Transcript for storing breast milk video.

Transcript for storing breast milk video

Voice

[Music]

Breast milk can be stored. Remember to use a sterilised container to put the milk in.

You can store your breast milk in the fridge for up to 48 hours.

Lactation consultant

So Rebecca for storing your breast milk now that, I mean you must be getting some really good volumes, what do you do?

Mum

At the moment I'm storing for 24 hours, uh, the fresh milk, uh, because the wee-er baby, this one, is getting top ups, um, so she breastfeeds and then we give her the expressed top up ...

Lactation consultant

Yes

Mum

... um, just to get, um, her weight gain up. Uh... and I also, um, if I get excess, I freeze, um, the excess supply.

Lactation consultant

We know that if you expressed that now, you could leave it in, at this temperature for four hours before you need to put it in the fridge and then you'd store it at the back of the fridge. Always label of course and date your breast milk which is really important because you need to make sure which was the first expressed.

Mum

[Muffled words of agreement]

Lactation consultant

Yes absolutely, so label and date it, pop it in the back of the fridge where it doesn't change temperatures. You wouldn't put it on the door because then every time you open the door, it changes temperature

Mum

[Muffled words of agreement]

Yep no we have it at the back. Don't we? And we have it in the freezer downstairs rather than the freezer we use.

[Music]

Voice

It's best to store it at the back in the lower half of the fridge, never in the door. This should keep it [sound of fridge door closing] between two to four degrees Celsius.

You can keep breast milk at room temperature, in a cool dark place, for up [sound of tap running] to four hours.

[Sound of tap running continues]

Voice

Your breast milk can be stored for up to three to six months in a freezer. Allow your frozen breast milk to defrost itself in the fridge. When it's thawed, use it straight away.

[Sound of running tap]

Voice

Your baby might like warm milk.

[Sound of running tap]

Voice

Stand the bottle in a container of hot water and let it heat to body temperature before feeding. 

Lactation consultant

... and that will sit in there and occasionally just test it. You test it on the forearm here and you shouldn't really feel it. If it's exactly the right temperature, it should be neither hot nor cold.

Voice

 Microwaving bottles is not recommended because the uneven heating can burn your baby's mouth and the heat can damage the food value and health protecting qualities of breast milk.

Lactation consultant

Did you feel that or is that about the right temperature?

Mum

I can't feel anything. Is that meant to be normal?

Lactation consultant [Dialogue spoken at same time in parts]

That's ...that will mean it's the right temperature to feed your baby.

Mum [Dialogue spoken at same time in parts]

Right temperature? Oh yeah.

Mum [Dialogue spoken at same time in parts]

All right. Cool.

Lactation consultant [Dialogue spoken at same time in parts]

Perfect. Well done 

Voice

Once warmed and before feeding, always swirl the container of milk to mix well and test the temperature by shaking a few drops of milk on the inside of your wrist.

[Music]

Voice

The milk should feel just warm on your skin.

[Music]

Lactation consultant

So we'd store it for four hours at room temperature, two days in the fridge, or four months in the freezer.

This page last reviewed 16 July 2013.
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