Fatigue due to chemotherapy

Fatigue due to chemotherapy

Fatigue is associated with several childhood cancers at diagnosis and most childhood cancers during treatment. Fatigue in the cancer patient is usually chronic (long lasting) and includes both physical and psychological tiredness. Some of the factors which may contribute to chronic fatigue are fear and anxiety about treatment, inadequate nutrition, infection, anaemia, sleep disturbance and altered mobility. 

What is fatigue associated with?

Fatigue is associated with several childhood cancers at diagnosis and most childhood cancers during treatment.

Fatigue can interfere with a child's quality of life.

What causes fatigue in children with cancer?

It is not exactly known what causes fatigue in children and young people with cancer and there are many theories explaining this, (more research is needed), but it is known that fatigue in the cancer patient is usually chronic (long lasting) and includes both physical and psychological tiredness.

Some of the factors which may contribute to chronic fatigue are fear and anxiety about treatment, inadequate nutrition, infection, anaemia, sleep disturbance and altered mobility. 

How can fatigue be managed?

The effects of fatigue can be managed with extra rest times.

Where to go for more information and support

On this website

Childhood cancer: Where to go for more information and support

All the information in the Childhood cancer section of this website have been written by health professionals who work in the field of paediatric oncology. They have been reviewed by the members of the National Child Cancer Network (NZ). Medical information is authorised by the National Child Cancer Network Clinical Leader.

This page last reviewed 22 June 2013.
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