Principle 5: Culturally safe practice

Principle 5: Culturally safe practice

Health care and disability support services should provide culturally safe services to all children, young people and their families.

Introduction

The following is one of a group of principles which recognise the particular needs of children and young people receiving health and disability support services. The principles describe what should be provided when your child or young person receives those services. They are based on expert opinion and a considerable body of literature in New Zealand and overseas and they have been developed after wide consultation. See all the principles listed in Principles: what health and disability services should provide for your child or young person.

Culturally safe practice

Principle: Health care and disability support services should provide culturally safe services to all children, young people and their families.

Health care and disability support services should be culturally safe. Services need to be flexible enough to respond in an acceptable, culturally appropriate and safe way for children and young people and their families of all cultures.

You have the right to have your belief and value systems responded to sensitively and have all aspects of your religion, food, prayer, dress, privacy, customs etc respected.

You can expect:

  • the service provider to take account of the language, culture and religion of your family
  • health care staff to work holistically and in partnership with your family to find out and respect your beliefs, and take these into account when delivering their service
  • interpreting services to be available, and
    • interpreters that are booked before your appointment wherever possible
    • your child to be never used as an interpreter - this can put you and your child under considerable stress and limit communication
  • support for access to the spiritual care of your choice. Kaumatua, chaplain services and cultural support are usually readily available. You will need to tell your health care provider if your needs are specific and different from those provided
  • to be able to have a support person / people present with you

This page last reviewed 25 March 2015.
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