Voice

Voice

If your child is having difficulty with their voice, try to reduce situations where your child is yelling or talking over the top of noise. Encourage periods of quiet activities to give the voice a rest.

What is a voice problem?

A child may have difficulty with their voice when it frequently sounds:

  • rough or hoarse 
  • husky
  • nasal (like they are talking through their nose)
  • unusual or different to their friends' voices

Some children may lose their voice completely at times.

Graphic of child sitting on floor and playing with connector toys

Tips

  • try to reduce situations where your child is yelling; for example, try not to yell across a room or playground, instead encourage them to walk over to talk to someone
  • try to reduce situations where your child is talking over the top of noise; for example, loud music
  • encourage periods of quiet activities to give the voice a rest; for example, looking at books or doing a construction or craft activity

Who should I talk to if I am concerned about my child's voice?

If you have any concerns about your child's voice talk to your child's doctor who may refer your child to a specialist or a speech language therapist.

The content on this page has been produced in collaboration with the Ministry of Education and adapted from Much more than words | Manuka takoto, kawea ake (2014) (PDF, 565KB)

This page last reviewed 19 February 2018.
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